Barkin Bird Bones

I never let Kirby eat chicken bones.  I don't care if they are raw or not, it just seems like an accident waiting to happen.  But then the other day I was making a pot of chicken stock and a light bulb went off.   Just as I was about to trash the carcass I decided why not grind it up for some kind of treat since dogs do need the calcium found in bones.

Which is exactly what I did.  The bones, the liver, the heart, the gizzards and the neck all went into my Ninja food processor.  What I had was a very soft mixture.  I gave Kirby a taste which he greedily lapped up so I forged ahead.  First I made some Bone Bark which was super easy. Then I baked up some treats.  Next time I'll start adding spices and herbs to up the flavor.  This time I wanted 100% pure chicken bone.

If you don't make your own chicken stock, you can use the carcass from a baked or rotisserie chicken.  Any bird bones , including turkey and duck, should be easy to grind.

Barkin Bird Bones

Barkin Bird Bones

A simple dog treat made from ground up chicken bones and organ meat.

Yields: varies
Prep Time:
Cook Time:

Nutrition facts: Calories: 17
Calories from fat: 0

Ingredients

  • leftover chicken carcass
  • neck and organ meat

Instructions:

  1. Grind the cooked carcass and organ meat adding water only if necessary.
  2. To make bark, roll out very thin between two pieces of wax paper. Remove top layer and using kitchen shears cut into sizes that will fit in your dehydrator. Place the pieces, with the bottom wax paper, on the racks. When the top side is dry, turn over, removing the wax paper. This can also be done in the oven at the lowest temperature.
  3. To make treats, place batter in a baggie, snip a corner, and squeeze out log shapes. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Turn off the oven and leave the treats until they have hardened. If you really want to make shapes with cookie cutters, add some flour to make the dough it easier to manage otherwise they will lose their shape like mine did.

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Be aware that although excess calcium is not dangerous for adult dogs, large amounts can lead to constipation so feed these sparingly, two or three small pieces per day 

Cooksnaps